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by Robert Dotson

July 1st were the presidential elections in Mexico people traveled far and wide in order to vote for the next person to lead and represent the country. The voting process in México is very similar to the one that takes place in the United States, although there are some differences. In these last elections people were not just voting for president, but also for the people to sit in the senate and the congress. In Mexico, there are more than just two parties to choose from, in fact there are around three to ten different parties competing for the positions. Amongst all the different parties the most prevalent ones are Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI), Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), and Partido Verde that are supported by the government. The other parties are usually independent and are funded privately by the members.

The voting boxes open around eight in the morning and close around six in the evening. People that are registered voters must go to the designated location, that is chosen based on the area that they live and the number that is found in their voting credential. Once one arrives at the designated location the people go to one of the lines with your last name’s initial and wait till they call you. Once you arrive to the front of the line the representatives of the Instituto Federal Electoral, or IFE for short, will ask for your IFE identification and hand you all the ballots for the candidates. Once you receive the ballots you go to one of the empty booths, where you’ll find a pen and mark the box for who you vote for. After crossing out all the given papers they are folded and dropped in to the respective boxes. Then afterwards you go back to the front desk of your line where they’ll return your identification with a small bump and then they mark your thumb with black ink to show that you’ve already voted.

I went with my parents to the voting booth that was assigned to our section around nine in the morning. We arrived at an old elementary school were everything was set up. There were several people already in line to vote and some were already in their booths. My dad and I  got in one line and my mom had to go to another line to get her ballots. After waiting for some time we received our ballots and went to the empty booths assigned to our line. We filled out our ballots and dropped them in their respective boxes. As we waited for my mom to finish, my dad and I were able to talk to some friends that had come to vote as well.

Needless to say but this is something that everyone has to do to make a difference in a country’s future. Regardless of who one may vote people must believe that their choices will make a difference.


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