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By: Erika Smith

 

As apart of the summer events in the city, Millennium Park hosts “Movies in the Park” every Tuesday night for free. A great way to get out the house and enjoy a film for the night. This year’s screenings of the movies are in collaboration with local independent film festivals. This past Tuesday, the movie that was shown was the 2000 drama, High Fidelity. Rob, the main character, spends most of the film sulking around on the grounds that ladies would prefer not to engage in sexual relations with him. He refers to his number one most exceedingly awful separation as viewing a young lady in center school kiss another person after she had kissed him. At age 35, he sees all other fizzled connections as coolly fixing to that pubescent experience.

In describing his main five most exceedingly bad heartbreaks, Rob acts like he has been denied some inborn appropriate to the assemblages of the considerable number of ladies he has dated (and can evidently just alleviate the subsequent self-hatred via looking for the reasons they wouldn’t lay down with him). When he reconnects with one of his exes (Joelle Carter) and inquires as to why she would have intercourse with another person however not him, she says she was so depleted after Rob said a final farewell to her that she said “approve” to her new accomplice, yet it was “fundamentally assault.” Rob reacts by leaving the eatery and completing a triumph move.

Truth be told, the possibility of men growing up is the clearest message of the film. “It’s in favor of the ladies,” he clarified. “And after that the man needs to figure out how to treat the ladies appropriately.”

The other conceivable perusing of the film, he recommends, is that “adoration is more critical than marriage.” He indicates one of the last scenes, when Laura says no to Rob’s unconstrained (and for the most part discourteous) proposition, in which he says he’s sick of reasoning in regards to marriage and needs to get it off the beaten path. She hurls up a snide acknowledgment and after that turns him down.

There’s very little further accentuation on marriage other than that one scene. However, maybe what Frears implies is that the customs of getting together, naming connections and demanding every one final relationship everlastingly is not realistic in anyway. Just focus on the feelings for the person don’t over complicate things.

Through much maturing over time and finally taking that step into manhood, Rob learned to fit his complicated reality with Laura in the end when he makes her a CD. It takes many men time to get to this point. He learned to treat her better which many men will do if they really care for you whereas others never mature fully and live in a constant state of hurting women by leading them on to lead to nothing but dreams and unbroken promises.


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