• 13
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
    13
    Shares

by Alexandra Gill

Red light cameras were created to stop drivers from speeding after a yellow light to red. People are unhappy with the city’s decision to put more cameras in Chicago after opening their mailboxes to see a ticket. The purpose of red light cameras is to monitor the safety of drivers, but it is now the nightmare of their wallets. The concern of Chicagoans is why are there more cameras in the main intersections. Some people think the red light cameras benefit the city economically, and some believe the cameras help drivers to become more aware.

A few people shared their opinions about their concerns on red light cameras. The first question is, did Rahm Emmanuel make the right decision to put more cameras in Chicago? Why, or why not? In reply, “Rahm Emmanuel could have done more, but the cameras are a money maker,” said David Beal a driver that lives on the north side of Chicago. “There are too many cameras, so I don’t think we need more of them,” said Kathy Fairex a driver that commutes to downtown Chicago. “I feel like no because they’re not reliable devices,” according to a driver that lives in Hyde park. Chicago drivers are skeptical of the fact that these cameras are a threat to them financially.

Some drivers believe that the red light cameras decrease car accidents, but they are a strain on Chicagoans financially because of the price of a ticket is one-hundred dollars. People think that the placement of the red light cameras targets the urban areas.  “Yes, they have limited the number of accidents that have occurred in busy areas where there are schools. Unfortunately, the cameras are in low-income intersections,” said a driver that resides in the south-side Chicago area. “I think people are more conscious because they know the cameras are there,” said a commuter that works downtown. Studies have shown that car crashes are more likely to happen where there is a red light camera. According to the Tribune, “the authors of the study found a statistically significant, but still smaller, reduction in angle and turning injury crashes by 15 percent, as well as a statistically significant increase of 22 percent in rear-end injury collisions”. Drivers are second-guessing themselves on whether to take the yellow light and risk getting flashed by the camera.

The City of Chicago should cut down on the cameras and focus on how they increase car crashes and doubt in their ability to keep drivers around the city safe.”Since I’ve gotten a red light ticket less of them will be a financial benefit to me, but it wouldn’t be a financial negative to the city. I think it’s more of a money-making activity then it actually done something to reduce accidents,” said Kathy Fairex a local Chicagoan.

People may be in a hurry for work trying to beat rush hour in Chicago can be a pain especially now since the red light cameras are in the common areas like Western, Cicero, Fullerton, and State Street. The City of Chicago should become more sympathetic to these issues.”The city will be paying up to half of what ticketed motorists had to pay from a fund of $26.75 million and will forgive up to $12 million in unpaid debt,” according to NBC 5 Chicago.


  • 13
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
    13
    Shares

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here