• 5
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
    5
    Shares

By: Erika Smith

  The biggest face in music today, the self-proclaimed 6 God, Drake has created an arguably legend status with his past 7 projects. Getting fans around the globe to vibe with his one of a kind mix of pop rap and R&B that can either get you into a great mood full of energy or absolutely depressed, for the most part on the same album. This being his first platinum album to reach 1 billion online streams a week after being released, Drake’s Scorpion has been an highly anticipated album by his fans since April of this year. The album dropped at the end of June and has been talked about ever since. There are some who still consider Drake to be a “pop vocalist,” just in light of the fact that his greatest hits incline toward radio, as though the man hasn’t put in work behind the mic. All things considered, the curbed, regularly enthusiastic, emotional late-night outcries have turned into a staple of his persona.

 

  But Scorpion isn’t just an endeavor to break streaming records. This is Drake’s opportunity to achieve what the legends have done before him, to secure his seat in hip-hop history

  The initial 12 tracks on side A are reputed to be the rap circle, which were perceived well, given two hit singles “God’s Plan” and “I’m Upset” are both present and represented. Drake showed each side of him that fans have appreciated and come to love from his past collections. The straightforwardness of “So Far Gone” and “Take Care”, the sharpness of “Nothing Was the Same”, and the trap punch of If “You’re Reading This It’s Too Late.” He reacted to some of what Pusha said on “The Story of Adidon,” he tossed some subliminals, however Drake seems to have been more centered around self-reflection than entering the pig pen.

  Drake doesn’t sound languid and exhausted as he did now and again on Views and More Life. This isn’t the Drake who raps like he’s at the highest point of CN Tower. This is the Drake who has a remark; he needs us to realize that he hasn’t missed a stage. Also, he’s telling us over a portion of his best beat determinations. The 12 melodies that make up the A-SIDE is the most grounded gathering of records we’ve gotten from Drake in a long while.

 

  It’s nothing unexpected that Side B includes a lot of engaging melodic songs but the tunes are more raw and holds much more emotion. Regardless of Side A, an inclination emphatically more prompt, Side B is seemingly the more total of the two. Like its ancestor, Side B begins off with solid, with the quieted despairing of “Pinnacle” and the irresistible nostalgia of “Summer Games,” which feels roused by known Drake most loved Stranger Things. In spite of being specifically reminiscent of a famous Grease number, “Summer Games” has every one of the makings of a Drizzy radio banger. In spite of the fact that Side B generally slides lyricism to the side, Drake’s sure episodes of self-breaking down mansplanation definitely conveys a couple of pearls, similar to the ever-relatable “talk used to be shabby, these days it’s free, individuals are just as extreme as they telephone enables them to be.”  From that minute ahead, Scorpion proceeds with the way, never straying into offensiveness.

 

  Drake’s album is a rarity that’s enjoyable to see him grow as an artist, and put out quality work and be admired for it and not just for the legacy he’s made for himself. He still has quality work as an artist and is far from falling off lyrically. The album is a rarity of our generation, it goes down as a part of Hip-Hop history as record-breaking just as many great artist have done before him. From Aubrey Graham rapping on Degrassi to Drake platinum-selling artist topping the charts. Drake is soaring in the music world and doesn’t plan to come down anytime soon.

 


  • 5
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
    5
    Shares

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here